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What's a Wreck?

A Cake Wreck is any cake that is unintentionally sad, silly, creepy, inappropriate - you name it. A Wreck is not necessarily a poorly-made cake; it's simply one I find funny, for any of a number of reasons. Anyone who has ever smeared frosting on a baked good has made a Wreck at one time or another, so I'm not here to vilify decorators: Cake Wrecks is just about finding the funny in unexpected, sugar-filled places.

Now, don't you have a photo you want to send me? ;)

- Jen
Thursday
Apr042013

Clean-Up On Aisle 12

Note to Parents: Today's wreck may expand your child's vocabulary in some unsavory ways.

****


When Steve S.'s coworker received a transfer to a different branch, the store decided to get the coworker a going-away cake. The inscription was your typical "You make our store better!" kind of thing.

Now, normally this wouldn't be a problem, no matter how badly the Wreckerator mangles the inscription.

But then, normally the company in question is NOT BJ's Wholesale Club.

Which, naturally, someone chose to abbreviate:

Lunch time just got awkward.


I'd like to point out that Steve submitted this Wreck because "better" looks like "bitter," and he thought that was funnily appropriate. And it is, but clearly Steve's mind did not make the leap the rest of ours did. (Like I always say: Get your mind out of the gutter! There's barely room in here for mine.)

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Reader Comments (59)

Not sure what happened yesterday, but your bunny story is one of my favorite posts ever! I haven't laughed that hard since you were quoting Oscar! Love your work :)

April 4, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterAmy C

Thank you Jen and Jon (tHoJ) for your blog. I look forward to my daily laugh at your commentary (and that of the majority of the commenters as well). I'm sorry things got out of hand yesterday. I enjoyed the post and did not find it at all offensive.

April 5, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterEmily

@KarateLady, a spindle in this case is a small, pointed, metal rod mounted vertically and used to hold small pieces of paper, such as paid invoices or unpaid bills by impaling them. The use in the present case is figurative. "Do not fold, spindle or mutilate" is an instruction sometimes seen on business correspondence.

April 5, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterCraig

I too loved yesterdays post. Anyone who didn't needs to get a nice large shot in the rear with a humor dart lol. As for this one I can't stop snickering.

April 5, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterArlene

I don't know, I turn my back for a few hours and the kids start rough-housing... Can't believe something kicked off over a tongue in cheek post, there really are people out there who need to get lives. Perhaps you could run a repeat post about king cakes or with some historical innaccuracy that needs correcting to take their minds off those wascally wabbits.

Talking of tongue in cheek........

April 5, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterCaroline B

After laughing at the gutter meaning, I looked over it again and it looks like there were letters swiped out after "with" (the frosting looks fine, but the extra space and the smudgy end to "h" looked suspicious. I immediately wondered if it originally said "without", which makes it really said for Steve.

I mean, who needs that said on a cake?

Of course, saying it on a cake is better than some other alternatives, but still.

April 5, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterMarnie T

My page is now full of ads for BJ's Wholesale Club.

If they only knew...

April 5, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterSharon

Very funny.

April 5, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterLaura Saxon

Am i the only one that thinks reading it with bitter and a gutter dwelling mind makes it even funnier?

April 5, 2013 | Unregistered Commentermel

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