Search

My Other Blog

What's a Wreck?

A Cake Wreck is any cake that is unintentionally sad, silly, creepy, inappropriate - you name it. A Wreck is not necessarily a poorly-made cake; it's simply one I find funny, for any of a number of reasons. Anyone who has ever smeared frosting on a baked good has made a Wreck at one time or another, so I'm not here to vilify decorators: Cake Wrecks is just about finding the funny in unexpected, sugar-filled places.

Now, don't you have a photo you want to send me? ;)

- Jen

Entries in Sunday Sweets (294)

Sunday
Sep132009

Sunday Sweets: Ribbons and Lace

This week I figured we'd take a break from the geek themes and instead feature some Sweets that showcase amazing piping skills. This kind of cake art is becoming pretty rare in these days of all-fondant cakes, so it's nice to be reminded of the painstaking talent that a lot of the more traditional bakers possess. The designs can be deceptively simple, but it takes a practiced hand and a lot of patience to get results like these.

First, let's start off with some lovely scroll work and piped pearls:

(Made by Yukiko, aka Rosey Sugar.)

Gorgeous.


Here's a fondant-free example:

(Submitted by Amanda T. and made by Das Meyer Fine Pastry Chalet.)

That's all hand-piped! Here, check out the detail:


This next one contains some mind-boggling string work. (String work uses royal icing, which hardens after it dries.) Just look at this:

Those triangular pillows on the side were made by layering royal icing in a lattice pattern. It's incredibly fragile, and there's no room for error. That goes double for that astounding bottom ruffle of strings. Each strand is piped individually, and is literally suspended over thin air. Look how perfect the spacing is:

I love the color on this next one:

(Made by Annie K. of Annie's Art Book)

Orange and white - awesome! Love the ball and the butterflies, and the way this baker used the molded lace edging is really unique and modern:

Doesn't it look like crochet? Hard to believe it's actually icing.

And last is the most technically difficult of today's bunch:

(Also by Rosey Sugar. Thanks to Donatella for the link!)

What makes this cake so impressive is the icing drop strings and the hanging scroll border. For the strings, each strand was in effect piped in mid-air. The tip is pulled away and placed in the same spot, hopefully leaving an unbroken string. Then, to really show off her mad skilz, the decorator did a second tiny loop inside of the first one:


For the scroll border, royal icing is layered on a flat surface, dried, and then carefully adhered to the base with more icing. Have I mentioned that this stuff is incredibly fragile? 'Cuz it is. I've been told that for a cake like this, you have to do the string work onsite; the slightest bump or jarring would cause them all the break right off.

Well, hopefully you have a better appreciation for piping art now! Thanks to today's bakers!

Sunday
Sep062009

Sunday Sweets: WoW

Some of you know that Jen and I are currently geeking out at the biggest geek fest in the south, Dragon*Con. (For the 98.6 percent of you who read this blog but are not, in the strictest sense of the word, "geeks", Dragon*Con is a convention where the majority of the attendees could tell you, without hesitation, the complete works of Joss Whedon and how Jar Jar Binks single-handedly destroyed Lucas' credibility. But, I digress.

This week, we're going to broaden your horizons with something so geeky that even I know nothing about it: World of Warcraft. Apparently, this is a "game" where "players" spend untold thousands of hours walking around and killing things and otherwise forfeiting what was left of their "lives." To do this, I asked Jen's brother Ben, who is himself a recovering WoW addict, to help decipher these cakes. So let's get started, shall we?

(Submitted by Kelly J. and made by Swank Cakes.)

Our first cake is a laptop with a screen-shot of a member of the Horde called the Tauren shaman. We think that the book cake under it says "Shaman for Dummies."

And here's another angle:

"Gold farming" is a term loosely defined as selling imaginary money for real money. Kind of like the stock market, only dominated by Chinese corporations. (Okay, exactly like the stock market.)

(Submitted by Rachel T. and made by Crazy Cakes.)

This next one is actually awesome even if you know nothing about WoW. Since I went through the effort of finding out, however, I might as well share. She is an Alliance Paladin. Or maybe a warrior. Do you feel more educated? Moving on then...

(Submitted by JJ T. and Made by Art Eats Bakery.)

Here we have a bunch of well-made boxes with a chest on top. The only real WoW reference is the red banner with the Horde symbol. I get the impression that everybody who plays WoW is in the Horde (the bad guys) and that the Alliance (the good guys) are all "noobs," or geeks of lesser standing (as determined by those who really are in no position to judge). Got all that?

(Submitted by Tess L. and made by Anne Marie Martino.)

Okay, now we're cooking with gas. This is a shield which has been emblazoned with the symbol for - say it with me - the Horde. Nice woodgraining though.

And finally, we have a cake based on one of the most popular places in the game, the bank in Ogrimmar, the capital city of the Horde.

(Submitted by Jennifer E. and made by Eden Cakes.)

For reference, here's a screen shot of the building in the game:

On a side note, see those itty bitty game people with the colorful words over their heads? Those are your IT guys, your Microsoft employees, and your computer repair people. In short, the folks who keep the internets running and, thusly, control the world. So be nice to them, or someday, when you least expect it, you just might find yourself barred from Facebook. And then what will you do? Call somebody?

A big thanks to Ben, logger of untold hours in Horde-y land, for finally putting all that knowledge to good use.

(Just kidding, Ben! We all know nothing good comes from the Horde.)

- Similar Sweets: Star Wars