Search

My Other Blog

What's a Wreck?

A Cake Wreck is any cake that is unintentionally sad, silly, creepy, inappropriate - you name it. A Wreck is not necessarily a poorly-made cake; it's simply one I find funny, for any of a number of reasons. Anyone who has ever smeared frosting on a baked good has made a Wreck at one time or another, so I'm not here to vilify decorators: Cake Wrecks is just about finding the funny in unexpected, sugar-filled places.

Now, don't you have a photo you want to send me? ;)

- Jen
Monday
Mar072011

King Me

So there's this traditional Mardi Gras dessert called the King Cake, and it's, well...

Yeah. Like that.

Now, the fun part of the King Cake is that there's a baby in it.

Not a REAL baby, of course; that would be edible.



No, this is a tiny, plastic, inedible baby (a la carrot jockey) hidden inside the doughy goodness. The person who cracks a molar on said non-edible baby is King or Queen for the day, and traditionally is required to make next year's deep-fried baby fritter.

If that's you, then here's what you need to make a proper King Cake:

- (1) giant donut
- Melted white icing
- (1) ton each of gold, green, and purple sprinkles
- (1) baby, non-edible

As I'm sure you can imagine with an ingredient list like that, it's pretty much impossible to mess this up.

"Mardi Gras": French for "nutritional elegance."

Traditionally speaking, the King Cake is not the most pleasing thing to look at. In fact, if your King Cake is a hideous blob of slime and sprinkles, then, congratulations! You nailed it!

Of course, some bakers do try to hide the hideousness with beads, coins, and any other shiny objects they have lying around:

Cake? What cake? Ooooh, look! Shiiiiiiiny.

Others change the tradition all together:

"I dunno...if it isn't a giant, sugar-coated, deep-fried doughnut with a plastic trinket inside, it just starts to look a little ridiculous."

And, given our sue-happy world, bakers do have to make sure customers are aware of the non-edible baby choking hazard:

You have my attention.

Still, there's gotta be a better way to warn folks there's a non-edible baby baked into the cake, right? You know, something a little more self-explanatory? Something that just screams, hey, buddy, there's a non-edible baby in this cake!

That works.

Remember, the King Cake was originally created as a treat to enjoy before Lent, when many people give up their favorite foods or sweets for 40 days.


So this oughta hold you for the first week or two.

Thanks to Anony M., Brinn M., Brooke S., Marcia T., Chastity B., Kelley H., Brandon H., Lauren, & Kiki, who think Fat Tuesday just got a little skinnier.

UPDATE: Whatever you do, DO NOT venture into the comments today. Our EPCOT threat level is at RED, people. RED! Run away! Don't look back! And whatever you do, DO NOT SAY A KING CAKE IS DEEP-FRIED! OR CAJUN! OR TASTES BAD!

[Kermit flail] AAAAAUUUUGGGHHH!!!

Sunday
Mar062011

Seussical Sunday Sweets

In honor of Dr. Seuss' birthday last week, let's take a look at some Sweets that would make the good doctor proud.

 

Submitted by Katelyn P. and made by Violet Sweet Shoppe

 

Like we could start with anything but green eggs and ham. ;)

 

 

These are a few of my favorite Things:

 

By Marj J. of The Icing on the Cake

 

 

And check out the detail on these cupcakes:
Submitted by Kaity G. and made by Sift Dessert Bar

 

It only seems natural that a Seuss cake should defy the laws of gravity:

 

Sub'd by Wendy O., made by Kate of And Everything Sweet (hit the link for more pics)

 

 

By Karen's Specialty Cakes and Confections

 

And the famous Cat in the Hat's striped hat is almost synonymous with Dr. Seuss:

By Dessert Works

Look at that razor-sharp edge! That is some awesome icing work.

 

 

Here's the sweetest Seuss birthday cake I've ever seen:

 

By Christina of Creative Cake Designs

 

Look at that green balloon! And the hand-cut lettering! [swoon]

Here's another inspired by the same book:

 

Sub'd by Ashley C., made by Glenda's Good Witch Goodies

 

These colors are just gorgeous. I'm also stumped as to how the baker made the stripes. They don't look painted on, and I see no seams, so...? (Glenda, can you weigh in?)

Seuss is often credited with the whimsical and topsy-turvy style for cakes, and you can definitely see his influence on this wedding cake:

Photo found here, made by Mike's Amazing Cakes

Of course, I think nothing would delight Dr. Seuss more than a wedding cake that hangs upside down from the ceiling:

 

By Chrissie B. of Too Nice To Slice

 

 

WOW. Just when you thought you'd seen it all...

 

 

Have a Sweet to nominate? Then send it to Sunday Sweets [at] Cake Wrecks [dot] com.

 

Update: We got a late entry today that was too good not to post.

 

By Cakes by Suzy

 

So cool!